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Concussion Research: Youth Concussions

Key Resources

This page contains current research articles on youth sports and concussions in children.

Returning to Learning Following a Concussion

This report, issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2013, addresses issues students may have after suffering a concussion, particularly with learning and memory, as well as the possibility of increased symptoms due to noisy environments or very bright rooms, which are common in school environments.

Halstead, M., Mcavoy, K., Devore, C., Carl, R., Lee, M., & Logan, K. (2013). Returning to Learning Following a Concussion. Pediatrics, 132(5), 948-957.

Pediatric Sports-Related Concussion: A Review of the Clinical Management of an Oft-Neglected Population

Concussion affects younger athletes differently than adult ones. This article examines the differences a physician may notice between a concussed adult and a concussed child, as well as tracking treatment and recovery guidelines.

Kirkwood, M. (2006). Pediatric Sport-Related Concussion: A Review of the Clinical Management of an Oft-Neglected Population. Pediatrics,117(4), 1359-1371.

Sensitivity and Specificity of Subacute Computerized Neurocognitive Testing and Symptom Evaluation in Predicting Outcomes After Sports-Related Concussion

The subjects of this study were 108 male high school football players who were used 'to quantify the prognostic ability of conputerized neurocognitive testing, in combination with symptoms during the sub-acute recovery phase from sports-related concussion.'

Lau, B., Collins, M., & Lovell, M. (2011). Sensitivity and Specificity of Subacute Computerized Neurocognitive Testing and Symptom Evaluation in Predicting Outcomes After Sports-Related Concussion. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 39(6), 1209-1216.