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Concussion Research: Rehabbing Concussion & PCS / Return to Play

Key Resources

This page contains current research articles on concussions in sports and up-to-date information on post-concussion syndrome.

What is Post-Concussion Syndrome?

Post-concussion syndrome involves a subset of patients who are experiencing symptoms beyond expected healing rates. 

The World Health Organization defines PCS as a persistence of 3 or more of the following after head injury:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • fatigue
  • irritability
  • insomnia
  • concentration difficulty
  • memory difficulty.

On the left are some research articles involving new methods for resolving post-concussion syndrome.

Cervicovestibular Rehabilitation in Sport-Related Concussion: a Randomised Controlled Trial

A Preliminary Study of Subsymptom Threshold Exercise Training for Refractory Post-Concussion Syndrome

Rehabilitation of Concussion & Post-Concussion Syndrome

This review of the research will assist practitioners on how to rehabilitate patients who have suffered concussions, as well as those who are not progressing past some symptoms. Having reviewed research from 1966 to 2011, it shows what has been effective thus far in reducing symptoms and getting patients back to normal function.

Leddy, J., Sandhu, H., Sodhi, V., Baker, J., & Willer, B. (2012). Rehabilitation of Concussion and Post-concussion Syndrome. Sports Health, 4(2), 147-54.

Return to Full Functioning after Graded Exercise Assessment and Progressive Exercise Treatment of Postconcussion Syndrome

This article discusses the effect of exercise training on participants after a post-concussion syndrome diagnosis and their ability to return to normal physiological function, including autonomic balance and the improvement of cerebral blood flow autoregulation.

Baker, J., Freitas, M., Leddy, J., Kozlowski, K., & Willer, B. (2012). Return to Full Functioning after Graded Exercise Assessment and Progressive Exercise Treatment of Postconcussion Syndrome. Rehabilitation Research and Practice, 1-7.